Supply Chain Management: An End-to-End Journey

Tolga Tuksal

Director of Strategic Global Sourcing, Supply Chain at Dayco

Learning Objectives

Join us for an Executive Interview with the Director of Strategic Global Sourcing, Supply Management at Dayco. In this interview, we will dive into the world of supply chain management and the challenges that are currently being faced. Tolga Tuksal will also be discussing how they have managed to overcome these challenges and what advice he has for new professionals entering the world of supply chain!


Key Takeaways:



  • Please tell us about a bit about your current role

  • What does end to end journey mean?

  • What are some challenges that supply chain professionals face today?

  • Are there any practical solutions to overcome these challenges?

  • What advice would you give to new supply chain professionals?


"If you had lived 100 years you wouldn't have been able to experience what we have experienced the last couple of years."

Tolga Tuksal

Director of Strategic Global Sourcing, Supply Chain at Dayco

Transcript

Britt Erler

Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Scope Supply Chain Virtual Summit hosted on Quartz Network. My name is Britt Erler, QN Executive Correspondent. Thank you so much for joining us. I would like to welcome our Executive Speaker Tolga Tuksal, Director of Strategic Global Sourcing and Supply Management at Dayco. Welcome.


Tolga Tuksal

Hi, Britt. Thanks for having me. It’s a pleasure.


Britt Erler

It is a pleasure to have you here as well, and really excited to dive into the world of Supply Chain Management today, and to discuss the challenges that they are currently facing as well as your advice on the matter. Before we do so, if you wouldn’t mind giving the audience a quick background about what you’ve done in the past, and also your current role.


Tolga Tuksal

Thank you. First of all, Britt, thank you for giving me the opportunity to introduce myself. Currently, I’m responsible for purchasing and supply chain global purchasing and supply chain depot. I get to represent the great supply chain professionals we have around the globe—so proud to be working with them side by side, especially in current challenging times. I’ve been very lucky in my career to take on other roles in engineering, program management sales, until I get to the supply chain function. That really gives me a unique perspective.


Tolga Tuksal

To me, supply chain is a combination of everything from one end to another. It’s integrated into everything that an enterprise or company does.


Britt Erler

The first topic I really want to dive into today is this crucial idea of end to end journey. It is such a big deal when it comes to the success of an overall company. I want to hear from you personally, what it means, and why it is so crucial to the success of the business?


Tolga Tuksal

This is a great question, Britt. In a way, end to end represents the whole enterprise. What I mean by that is, let’s imagine a line with a start point and an end point. Let’s imagine that line is the whole enterprise, but on the start end, you have the source and suppliers, and at the other end, you have the customer. That line—everything that enterprise does—is representative of the supply chain, integrated supply chain. From source, you have to develop, make, move, store, distribute, sell, market, and get to the end customer. End to end basically is enterprises valve working, reaching from source to the customer.


Britt Erler

I believe, personally, that supply chain is one of the industries that got hit the hardest, especially when the pandemic hit, and now has really been brought into the spotlight with how crucial it is to a business’s success. What are some of the challenges that you’ve experienced?


Tolga Tuksal

Britt, this is a great question and the answer is not easy. COVID exposed our vulnerabilities in the supply chain, specifically in supply chain. Most of us in the automotive industry buy specific products, only manufactured by one supplier, maybe in one region, in one plant. Because of the competitive nature of automotive, we have a wide use of low cost country sourcing tool to remain competitive.


Tolga Tuksal

A couple of tools that we started using is bringing the supply from offshore to onshore. Now, this is not an overnight event, you have to go through process steps to make it happen. The challenge is now, how do you make that happen? Given the timing constraints, and all the other added pressures caused by COVID, because you still have to demand you have to meet that demand. You still have to be operational. In the meantime, you have to take those actions to find the solutions that are caused by COVID in the environment in this environment.


Britt Erler

I think that’s such a difficult thing to manage as well. Not only because you’re having to implement the new strategies so quickly just to make sure that the company survives, but also you have to make sure that your team is up to par.


Britt Erler

My next question for you would be, when you’re implementing these new strategies, how do you ensure that it’s aligned across teams in the best way possible?


Tolga Tuksal

There are multiple ways of approaching this. To me, the most effective way is communication of why—why we’re doing this and how we will do this. Once you establish the protocol, the process, do a read across and repeat it. Standardize the process and repeat it, so that there is no variability. There is no ifs or buts. Obviously, the quicker, the more agile you are, the quicker you can communicate and put the process in place, the better off you are because we’re in a very dynamic environment.


Britt Erler

I completely agree with you. With quickly pivoting, obviously, you’ve had to come up with a lot of practical solutions to put in place to ensure that you can overcome all of these challenges that you’ve just talked about. In your experience and what you’ve seen, not just with COVID and everything that happened last year, but in your experience in supply chain professional, what are some of those practical solutions that are best suited you?


Tolga Tuksal

Another great question, Britt, and it’s not easy to answer. It’s a difficult to answer but let me try to answer it this way. Once you identify the problem, which is to understand the vulnerabilities in your supply chain, you need to figure out how to redesign your supply chain. Take a permanent corrective action, if you will, so that you prevent reoccurrence.


Tolga Tuksal

One way to do this is to make sure you have a process where you classify the risk—identify and classify the risk. Maybe it’s low, medium, high. Maybe red, yellow, green. And then prioritize which ones you have to tackle first.


Tolga Tuksal

Just to give you an example, if I know I’m vulnerable, specifically one component coming from one country, high risk, only manufactured in one place, and that will shut down my entire operation, which will result into revenue loss. Operational, halt shutdown. That’s my priority.


Tolga Tuksal

Another way to approach this is building contingencies into your process. Right now we’re all facing in supply chain world increased transportation lead times. This is a fact now that we have to live with. Now we know it, maybe what we need to do is we need to build more lead time or our orders.


Tolga Tuksal

If we need a certain product components six weeks ahead of time, maybe we add another two weeks and order it eight weeks before. Why? Because we know there’s going to be a delay. Maybe we try to use the ports that are less congested. If we find a different way of moving product from point A to point B.


Tolga Tuksal

It all comes down to identifying where you’re vulnerable. What should be your priority? What KPI metric are you going to establish to track it? How you’re going to address it.


Britt Erler

Absolutely. Now a lot of these practical solutions almost seem to come second nature to you as being such an expert in this field. One thing that we’ve seen recently is such an influx of new supply chain professionals that are really just starting to get their hands dirty in the industry. What advice that you have for them to really make sure that they’re moving in the right direction?


Tolga Tuksal

First of all, it’s really a good time to be in the supply chain. I sometimes say this with our team, our great supply chain professionals I’ve worked with is that “If you had lived 100 years you wouldn’t have been able to experience what we have experienced the last couple of years.” It’s a really good time to be in supply chain. Every crisis, every difficult situation is a good lesson learned—experience.


Tolga Tuksal

First of all, have fun. You’re going to have supply chain issues, it’s just a matter of when, not if. That’s why you have a supply chain professional job. That’s why the company needs you. That’s why you have the job—to solve those problems. First of all, have fun. There will always be an issue, always a critical issue, and problem that you need to solve.


Tolga Tuksal

Second of all, I highly recommend it if you could easily go back to that end to end description earlier that we talked about, try to move across the functions, try to take on different roles in your career. I’ve been very lucky to have the opportunity to do different roles. Before I came to supply chain, which kind of gave me the understanding of how supply chain fits relative to other functions in the organization. Don’t be afraid to take other roles, expand your knowledge, learn more, and try to approach it in a way that supply chain is your end goal and gain.


Tolga Tuksal

I would also highly recommend that you read a lot. You try to grow and develop yourself outside of work. Pick a topic. Pick a problem, even if you don’t know the answer. Even if you don’t know the solution, start researching, reading different sources. Maybe consult with people you know in the industry or learning, reading, attending seminars is essential in supply chain.


Britt Erler

I think a lot of these insights too can really go hand in hand with even leaders who have been in the industry a long time. Do you have any separate advice for leaders such as yourself that are in a role managing a team or even just leaders whose roles expanded within this last year based on the changes within the industry?


Tolga Tuksal

This is a great question, Britt. What I would recommend is maybe not a recommendation, but the way I view things in my role, in my job, is everything is a learning experience for me.


Tolga Tuksal

Right now we’re dealing with a lot of variables. Altogether, there’s a lot of moving parts, we’re dealing with a lot of problems at the same time. We really don’t have time to go through detailed analysis and really reach to a conclusion with full data, information available to us, so we have to sometimes take a direction decision and then course correct as we move along or go along.


Tolga Tuksal

I would recommend to the leaders that are in this position to take a step back and focus on the bigger picture first. What is your end goal? Let’s say your end goal is to maximize the sales revenue, then you have to move product from point A to point B time. You have to schedule the production the right way. You have to make sure you’re translating the demand forecast to labor, machine hours production the right way. It’s really focusing on the end goal and then working from there.


Britt Erler

Great pieces of insight. As I mentioned in the very beginning, a lot of these tools and tips that you provided may not just be specific to supply chain professionals. They really can be utilized across the board in all departments and even other industries.


Britt Erler

Thank you so much, Tolga. This has been extremely helpful and really excited to see what our supply chain professionals that are watching this have questions about because I’m sure there’s a lot. Thank you to everyone who tuned in. There will be a discussion forum underneath this presentation where you can ask questions and comments. Please stay safe, everyone. Be healthy and enjoy the rest of the summit.


Tolga Tuksal

Thank you so much, Britt, for having me. I enjoyed that. Thank you.


Britt Erler

Of course. Thank you.


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